Al-Quran Surah 21. Al-Anbiyaa, Ayah 85

Al-Quran Grammar      Prev      Go   Next  
وَإِسْمَاعِيلَ وَإِدْرِيسَ وَذَا الْكِفْلِ ۖ كُلٌّ مِنَ الصَّابِرِينَ


Asad : AND [remember] Ishmael and Idris,80 and every one who [like them] has pledged himself [unto God]:81 they all were among those who are patient in adversity,
Malik : Likewise, We blessed Isma`il (Ishmael), Idris and Zul-kifl, for all of them practised patience.
Mustafa Khattab :

And ˹remember˺ Ishmael, Enoch, and Ⱬul-Kifl.1 They were all steadfast.

Pickthall : And (mention) Ishmael, and Idris, and Dhul-Kifl. All were of the steadfast.
Yusuf Ali : And (remember) Ismail Idris and Zul-kifl all (men) of constancy and patience; 2741 2742 2743
Transliteration : WaismaAAeela waidreesa watha alkifli kullun mina alssabireena
PDF content
Tags 


Share your thoughts about this with others by posting a comment. Visit our FAQ for some ideas.

Comment Filters >>
Filter Comments  

search-icon
User Roles  
Groups  
NO ADVERTISEMENT OR PROMOTION, PLEASE.
Asad   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
Asad 80 See surah {19}, note [41].
Asad   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
Asad 81 Lit., "and him of the pledge". The expression dhu 'l-kifl is derived from the verb kafala - and especially the form takaffala - which signifies "he became responsible [for something or someone]" or pledged himself [to do something]". Although the classical commentators consider dhu 'l kifl to be the peithet or the proper name of a particular prophet - whom they variously, more or less at randm, identify with Elijah or Joshua or Zachariah or Ezekiel - I fail to see any reason whatever for such attempts at "identification", the more so since we have not a single authentic hadith which would mention, or even distantly allude to, a prophet by this name. I am, therefore, of the opinion that we have here (as in the identical expression in 38:48) a generic term applying to every one of the prophets, inasmuch as each of them pledged himself unreservedly to God and accepted the responsibility for delivering His message to man.

No Comments Found

No Comments Found

Yusuf Ali   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
Yusuf Ali 2741 Isma'il is mentioned specially, apart from the line which descended through Isaac (xxi. 72), as he was the founder of a separate and greater Ummat. His sufferings began in infancy (see n. 160 to ii. 158); but his steady constancy and submission to the will of Allah were specially shown when he earned the title of "Sacrifice to Allah" (see n. 2506 to xix. 54). That was the particular quality of his constancy and patience.
Yusuf Ali   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
Yusuf Ali 2742 For Idris see n. 2508 to xix. 56. He was in a high station in life, but that did not spoil him. He was sincere and true, and that was the particular quality of his constancy and patience.
Yusuf Ali   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
Yusuf Ali 2743 Zul-kifl would literally mean "possessor of, or giving, a double requital or portion"; or else, "one who used a cloak of double thickness," that being one of the meanings of Kifl. The Commentators differ in opinion as to who is meant, why the title is applied to him, and the point of his being grouped with Isma'il and Idris for constancy and patience. I think the best suggestion is that afforded by Karsten Niebuhr in his Reisebeschreibung nach Arabian, Copenhagen, 1778, ii. 264-266, as quoted in the Encyclopaedia of Islam under "Dhul-Kifl". He visited Meshad 'All in 'Iraq, and also the little town called Kefil, midway between Najaf and Hilla (Babylon). Kefil, he says, is the Arabic form of Ezekiel. The shrine of Ezekiel was there, and the Jews came to it on pilgrimage. If we accept "Zul-kifl" to be not an epithet, but an Arabicised form of "Ezekiel", it fits the context. Ezekiel was a prophet in Israel who was carried away to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar after his second attack on Jerusalem (about B.C. 599). His Book is included in the English Bible (Old Testament). He was chained and bound, and put into prison, and for a time he was dumb (Ezekiel, iii. 25-26). He bore all with patience and constancy, and continued to reprove boldly the evils in Israel. In a burning passage he denounces false leaders in words which are eternally true: "Woe be to the shepherds of Israel that do feed themselves! Should not the shepherds feed the flocks? Ye eat the fat, and ye clothe you with the wool, ye kill them that are fed: but ye feed not the flock. The diseased have ye not strengthened, neither have ye healed that which was sick, neither have ye bound up that which was broken ...... etc. (Ezekiel, xxxiv. 2-4). Zul-kifl is again mentioned in xxxviii. 48 along with Isma'il and Elisha.
   
0 votes 0  dislikes 
29438

 Scholars are in disagreement as to whether Ⱬul-Kifl was a prophet or just a righteous man. Those who maintain that he was a prophet identify him with various Biblical prophets such as Ezekiel, Isaiah, and Obadiah.

Subscribe